SVLC

MARTINSVILLE, Va. — The Southern Virginia Land Conservancy, our region’s local land conservation non-profit, recently received a $10,000 grant from the Virginia Environmental Endowment.

The Land Conservancy will use the funds to help local rural landowners permanently protect their farms and forestland with conservation agreements. Landowners who protect their land may still farm, timber and do most rural activities on the land, but can’t develop it intensively. Landowners are usually eligible for state tax credits and federal tax deductions for conserving their land.

“We’re very grateful to the Virginia Environmental Endowment for providing this funding as we continue to kickstart local, community-based conservation in our community,” said David Perry, executive director of the Land Conservancy. “This valuable funding will conserve the lands and waters our residents love, while helping us build an organization that is focused on the needs and interests of our local citizens.”

The Southern Virginia Land Conservancy was founded in 2020 as a branch of the Roanoke-based Blue Ridge Land Conservancy, and shares staff and resources with Roanoke office. Today, the Southern Virginia Land Conservancy has more than two dozen conservation projects in Patrick, Henry, Pittsylvania and Halifax counties, protecting more than 2,000 acres of important Virginia land. The Southern Virginia Land Conservancy maintains an office in downtown Martinsville and has a part-time employee based in Pittsylvania County. To learn more, visit svalc.org, call (276) 224-6489, or e-mail choldren@svalc.org.

The Virginia Environmental Endowment (VEE) is a nonprofit grant-making foundation focused on improving the quality of the environment by using its capital, expertise and resources to encourage all sectors to work together to prevent

pollution, conserve natural resources, and promote environmental literacy. VEE was founded in 1977 when a federal court judge approved an $8 million settlement against Allied Chemical for polluting the James River with the toxic insecticide Kepone. Over its 40-plus year history, VEE has partnered with nearly 500 nonprofit organizations, universities, government agencies, schools and communities. Learn more at vee.org

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